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CurlingTown 2015 Wraps up in Rosetown

CurlingTown 2015 Wraps up in Rosetown

Thrills, Spills, and Glow Curling!

What a great couple weeks the team has had touring Saskatchewan for the 2016 version of the Decisive Farming CurlingTown…

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CurlingTown tour kicks off in Tisdale

CurlingTown tour kicks off in Tisdale

Tisdale and Outlook with a great turn out!

Tisdale and Outlook with a great turn out! Carnduff, Yorkton, and Rosetown still to come!

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2015 CurlingTown Results

2015 CurlingTown Results

2015 Decisive Farming CurlingTown presented by Crescent Point Energy selected its 5 locations to host youth curling events.

Communities selected to host Decisive Farming Curlingtown presented by Crescent Point Energy with Team Laycock/Team Saskatchewan Team Laycock / Saskatoon,…

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Pre Christmas Wrap-up

Pre Christmas Wrap-up

Looking forward to the hometown Slam. The Canadian Open in Yorkton

It is exciting times for this team, we continue to get that little bit better every event and are very…

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More curling to come for St. Gregor brothers

More curling to come for St. Gregor brothers

Humboldt Journal Article featuring Dallan and Kirk.

The road is long and busy for local curlers Kirk and Dallan Muyres.

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About Team Steve Laycock

 

Team Laycock is the top ranked men's curling team in Saskatchewan and 2015 Tim Horton's Brier Bronze Medal winners from Saskatchewan. The 2015/2016 season will mark the fourth full year together for this team, who have already established themselves as the 4th ranked team in Canada and 5th ranked team in the World. The primary goals for the team include representing Canada at the Winter Olympics and bringing the Brier Championship trophy back to Saskatchewan for the first time since 1980.

Read more about the team and their successes so far.

Ask the Team

I notice that your team uses some different terminology that I've never quite heard before. For instance "Max Weight", "Dead Weight", etc. It seems to be very descriptive, and maybe can provide more info to the guy in the house than maybe the "number" system. Jayson D.

I(we) try to use more descriptive terms as you have noticed. Sometimes I don't recall even what comes from our mouths in the heat of the moment, but directly to your question about 'Max Weight'. Let me step back a moment. Many teams use stopwatches to split the delivered rock from tee line to hog line, that is only a starting point. After the rock is delivered, the sweepers have a general idea where it will end up, however to precisely use a number can be difficult early in a shot. We use some words like 'max weight' or 'dead weight' to explain to the skip and the thrower that if we do not touch the rock, it will go on its very own to the deepest acceptable window on the ice. Typically 'dead weight' is used when referencing a freeze shot. The rock will be dead tight up to or slightly bump the intended freeze rock. 'Max weight' can be referred to all shots, draws, taps, take outs. All shots have an acceptable velocity to ensure that the anticipated curl is received. Stating 'max weight' on a come around hack weight tap signals to the thrower and skip that this rock has a slightly higher velocity and therefore may not act as you suspect it would with the 'perfect weight'. About half way down the sheet to the far hog line, we communicate more with the intent of saying things like 'top 4', 'top 8', 'tapping 6"',  'tight guard', 'etc'. >In my personal view, the number system requires more 'bytes of data' to be processed on both the sweepers end and the skips end. You translate a speed up to and number, communicate the number, then the skip decodes the number, and acts on the speed. Combine this with the fact that initially in a shot, the speed is simply a best guess and you ar throwing out all kinds of numbers that are encoded and decoded all the time.

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